The Moto G9 Power could be right around the corner with a massive battery in tow

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As popular and as good as (some of) Motorola’s Moto G-series devices have proven in the last few years, the mid-range smartphone roster doesn’t always make a lot of sense as far as naming conventions and release schedules are concerned.

For instance, the Lenovo-owned company recently decided to rebrand the Moto G9 as the G9 Play in select European markets after confusingly releasing the Moto G Fast and G Pro on the heels of the already extensive G8 family, as well as the G Stylus and G Power.

Motorola is definitely cooking up something big

The Moto G Power, of course, was merely a rebranded G8 Power, and hot on the heels of the G9 Plus, we now have reason to expect a Moto G9 Power to break cover soon. Several reasons, to be exact, as a mysterious Motorola handset carrying the XT2091 model number has been seen receiving multiple obligatory regulatory approvals from certification authorities as diverse as the FCC, EEC, and TUV Rheinland of late.
While that somewhat convoluted label does little to reveal the identity of this impending mobile device, sharing a family connection with everything from the Moto G8 Power (XT2041) to the Razr 5G (XT2071) and E7 Plus (XT2081), one of the certification records discovered by the eagle-eyed folks over at MySmartPrice discloses the remarkable battery size of the XT2091.

Specifically, it looks like the unknown phone will carry a rated cell capacity of 5,640mAh and a typical capacity of 6,000mAh. In case you’re wondering, the latter value is the one device manufacturers like to advertise for pretty obvious reasons, which means the Moto G9 Power could gain a solid 1,000mAh of juice on its already impressive predecessor.

Yes, we believe this handset will be sold under the G9 Power name, although we wouldn’t completely rule out the possibility of seeing a Moto E7 Plus sequel pack a gargantuan 6,000mAh battery either.

Then again, the E7 Plus is far too new for Motorola to be preparing its sequel’s release already, unlike the G8 Power, which was unveiled all the way back in February. Another important upgrade could see the G8 Power’s 18W fast charging technology improved to a top speed of around 22 watts, according to a different regulatory document, while a third one appears to reveal the look of the phone’s back cover.

Bigger than most, but not technically a record breaker

Unsurprisingly, the rear-mounted fingerprint scanner of both the G8 Power and E7 Plus is not going anywhere, while the main camera module will seemingly be redesigned and repositioned, likely including three imaging sensors and an LED flash arranged in a square-shaped formation.

Obviously, there are no words on pricing or availability yet, but if this year’s G Power and 2019’s G7 Power are any indication, the Moto G9 Power is likely to cost less than $300 and make its US commercial debut at some point in early 2021.

The mid-ranger’s number one feature, by the way, should be capable of eclipsing the battery life of most phones available today in the sub-$400 segment, including Samsung’s ultra-affordable and incredibly popular Galaxy A21, which packs a comparatively modest 4,000mAh cell. 
Of course, the world’s largest handset vendor has recently taken the wraps off a Galaxy M51 model with an absolutely colossal 7,000mAh battery on deck, but unlike the Moto G9 Power, we don’t expect to see that officially released stateside anytime soon… or ever. Instead, a possible future member of the OnePlus Nord family codenamed Clover could end up as one of the G9 Power’s biggest rivals in the US, with a similar 6,000mAh battery in tow and a rumored price point of around $200.

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