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Best Fiber Internet Providers in Your Area

AT&T Fiber – Coverage in the Midwest, South and California

  • Prices: $55 – $250 per month
  • Speeds: 300 – 5,000Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts, equipment included

Or call to learn more:
(888) 249-1978

Verizon Fios – Coverage in the Mid-Atlantic and New England

  • Prices: $50 – $120 per month
  • Speeds: 300 – 2,000Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts, free equipment with gig service

Or call to learn more:
(855) 786-3011

Frontier Fiber – Coverage in 15 states from California to Connecticut

  • Prices: $50 – $155 per month
  • Speeds: 500 – 5,000Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts, no equipment fee

Or call to learn more:
(888) 962-8445

Quantum Fiber – Coverage in Florida and the West

  • Speeds: 200 – 8,000Mbps
  • Prices: $30 – $165 per month
  • Key Info: Unlimited data on some plans, low price increase

Or call to learn more:
(833) 391-9661

Google Fiber – Coverage in 17 markets and growing

  • Prices: $70 – $150 per month
  • Speeds: 1,000 – 8,000Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts, equipment included

Or call to learn more:
(877) 339-3106

Metronet – Coverage in Florida, North Carolina and the Midwest

  • Speeds: 100 – 3,000Mbps
  • Prices: $30 – $115 per month
  • Key Info: Unlimited data on some plans, low price increase

Or call to learn more:
(844) 457-8608

Kinetic by Windstream – Coverage in suburban and rural areas of 18 states

  • Prices: $40 – $70 per month
  • Speeds: 100 – 1,000Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts

Or call to learn more:
(855) 891-0877

Ziply Fiber – Coverage in the Pacific Northwest

  • Prices: $20 – $900 per month
  • Speeds: 100 – 50,000Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts, fast rural internet connection

Or call to learn more:
(877) 306-4879

Brightspeed – Coverage in the South and East, former CenturyLink markets

  • Prices: $50 – $79 per month
  • Speeds: 10 – 940Mbps
  • Key Info: Unlimited data, no contracts

Or call to learn more:
(877) 806-0247

What’s the best fiber internet provider in your area?

Fiber internet is sought after for its fast, symmetrical speeds and unmatched reliability, but service can be hard to find. Your best bet for fiber internet comes from major internet service providers like AT&T Fiber, Frontier Fiber, Quantum Fiber and Verizon Fios. Such providers have the largest fiber-optic networks, bringing fiber internet to numerous markets across the US. 

That said, many regional and hyper-local internet providers also offer fiber internet. My fiber internet, for example, comes from Comporium, a small ISP serving my local area in the suburban Charlotte area.

Fiber internet providers, like most ISPs, operate in specific areas, so there may be only one or two available in your area. It’s also possible that no fiber providers are available near you. Or, perhaps a fiber provider serves your area but not your specific address.

So how do you know if fiber internet is available in your area? You’ll find a rundown of the largest fiber ISPs and where they offer service below, followed by tips for finding fiber internet near you.

10 best fiber internet providers by nationwide availability

  • AT&T Fiber – 12% coverage, available in 22 states
  • Verizon Fios – 9% coverage, available in eight states and Washington, DC
  • Frontier Fiber – 4% coverage, available in 15 states
  • Quantum Fiber – 2% coverage, available in 16 states
  • Google Fiber – 1% coverage, available in 12 states
  • Metronet – 1% coverage, available in 16 states
  • Kinetic by Windstream – 1% coverage, available in 18 states
  • Ziply Fiber – Less than 1% coverage, available in four states
  • Brightspeed – Less than 1% coverage, available in 18 states
  • GoNetspeed – Less than 1% coverage, available in eight states

Where to find the top fiber internet providers

Product image Product image
Speed range

300 – 5,000 Mbps

Price range

$55 – $250 per month

Our take – AT&T Fiber is the largest fiber provider in the US, with coverage spanning much of the South and Midwest, as well as California and parts of Nevada around Carson City and Reno. Otherwise, you won’t find AT&T Fiber much west of Texas or to the northeast, where Verizon Fios is a popular choice for fiber internet.

Or call to learn more:
(888) 249-1978

Speed range

300 – 5,000 Mbps

Price range

$55 – $250 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

300 – 2,000 Mbps

Price range

$50 – $120 per month

Our take – Though available in just nine states, Verizon Fios is second only to AT&T Fiber when it comes to fiber coverage. The provider primarily serves the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions, with coverage in major cities such as Baltimore, Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, New York City and Washington, DC.

Or call to learn more:
(855) 786-3011

Speed range

300 – 2,000 Mbps

Price range

$50 – $120 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

500 – 5,000 Mbps

Price range

$50 – $155 per month

Our take – Frontier has greatly increased its fiber coverage in recent years, expanding its availability from three to 15 states and growing. California, Florida and Texas are the biggest states with Frontier Fiber availability, but service can also be found from Minnesota to Connecticut and south to the Myrtle Beach area in South Carolina.

Or call to learn more:
(888) 962-8445

Speed range

500 – 5,000 Mbps

Price range

$50 – $155 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

200 – 8,000 Mbps

Price range

$30 – $165 per month

Our take – Parent company Lumen Technologies recently sold some of its DSL and fiber-optic networks, but Quantum Fiber is still a leading fiber provider. Service is mostly available west of the Mississippi River — Denver, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Salt Lake City and Seattle are popular Quantum Fiber markets, though service can also be found in much of Florida.

Or call to learn more:
(833) 391-9661

Speed range

200 – 8,000 Mbps

Price range

$30 – $165 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

1,000 – 8,000 Mbps

Price range

$70 – $150 per month

Our take – Like Frontier Fiber, Google Fiber has been persistently expanding its fiber coverage in recent years. While availability in existing markets like Atlanta; Huntsville, Alabama; Kansas City; and Raleigh, North Carolina has improved, Google Fiber has expanded into new cities, including West Des Moines, Iowa, and Mesa, Arizona, with plans for more to come.

Or call to learn more:
(877) 339-3106

Speed range

1,000 – 8,000 Mbps

Price range

$70 – $150 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

100 – 3,000 Mbps

Price range

$30 – $115 per month

Our take – Those in Daytona Beach or Tallahassee, Florida, or some of North Carolina’s smaller cities like Fayetteville, Greenville and Hickory may be serviceable for Metronet. Additionally, Metronet covers parts of the Midwest with serviceability greatest in Indiana, south of Minneapolis and west of Chicago.

Or call to learn more:
(844) 457-8608

Speed range

100 – 3,000 Mbps

Price range

$30 – $115 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

100 – 1,000 Mbps

Price range

$40 – $70 per month

Our take – With service in 18 states, Kinetic has one of the largest coverage areas of any fiber provider. However, actual availability is lower than most since the ISP largely operates in suburban and rural areas. Georgia and Kentucky have the greatest Kinetic serviceability, though the ISP also serves much of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Nebraska and Texas. 

Or call to learn more:
(855) 891-0877

Speed range

100 – 1,000 Mbps

Price range

$40 – $70 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

100 – 50,000 Mbps

Price range

$20 – $900 per month

Our take – Similar to Kinetic, Ziply Fiber largely caters to suburban and rural areas, bringing fiber internet to communities that are often overlooked for fiber connections. Ziply Fiber service areas include parts of Idaho, Oregon and Washington, including the greater Portland and Seattle areas, plus a bit of Montana around the city of Libby.

Or call to learn more:
(877) 306-4879

Speed range

100 – 50,000 Mbps

Price range

$20 – $900 per month

Product image Product image
Speed range

10 – 940 Mbps

Price range

$50 – $79 per month

Our take – When Lumen Technologies (CenturyLink/Quantum Fiber) sold a chunk of its network, most of it went to Connect Holding, the parent company of Brightspeed. The provider’s coverage area includes many markets formerly served by CenturyLink, including parts of Indiana, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wisconsin, and much of Missouri, eastern North Carolina and central Ohio.

Or call to learn more:
(877) 806-0247

Speed range

10 – 940 Mbps

Price range

$50 – $79 per month

Product image Product image

Our take – Fiber coverage from new ISP GoNetspeed is best in the Northeast, with Connecticut and Maine seeing the greatest availability. Service can also be found in Upstate New York, the greater Pittsburgh area, a small portion of Missouri and central Alabama between Birmingham and Huntsville.

Or call to learn more:
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Cable providers with fiber connections

Fiber is the top-tier technology when it comes to home internet. As a result, internet providers that traditionally used coaxial cable lines to run service have added fiber connections to their networks.

  • Astound Broadband – Known for its low introductory rates, Astound offers fiber internet in most of its markets, albeit to a limited number of households. Austin, Chicago and Seattle have Astound’s greatest fiber coverage. 
  • Cox Communications – Fiber service is slowly entering Cox markets, but at a slower pace than other cable ISPs. Most Cox cities, including Oklahoma City, Omaha, Phoenix and San Diego, see little fiber coverage from the cable ISP. 
  • Optimum – With more than 2.7 million homes, mostly in the greater NYC area, serviceable for fiber internet, Optimum has the best fiber coverage of any cable-first provider. Parts of Texas and western North Carolina (former Suddenlink markets) may also be eligible for fiber service.
  • Spectrum – Spectrum has arguably the largest fiber network of any traditional cable ISP, with coverage in parts of 20 states, including Hawaii. 
  • Xfinity – The nation’s largest cable provider also has a growing fiber network, though total coverage falls short of Optimum and Spectrum. Like Cox, Xfinity offers fiber internet in many of its markets, but actual availability is limited to select neighborhoods.

How to find fiber internet in your area

Your address determines the available connection types and internet providers. ISP search tools, like the one on this page, are a great starting point for finding internet providers in your area, fiber or otherwise. 

How many members of your household use the internet?

If you’re setting up internet in a new place, ask your neighbors (posts to Facebook neighborhood groups or Nextdoor are sure to get some responses) about which internet providers they use and why. Or, if you need internet for an apartment, check with the leasing office about available internet options for your home. 

Keep in mind that a neighbor’s opinion may be relatively uninformed or biased, and a leasing office may have ulterior motives when recommending an internet provider. Be sure to do your own research when shopping for internet service.

How do I know if an internet provider is fiber?

Once you have an idea of the available internet providers in your area, there are a couple of surefire ways to distinguish a fiber provider from a non-fiber provider. 

quantum-fiber-cnetbb-logo-c quantum-fiber-cnetbb-logo-c

Many ISPs advertise a fiber product right in the name — AT&T Fiber, Frontier Fiber, Google Fiber, Quantum Fiber, even Verizon Fios indicates fiber service. Others, like Brightspeed or Kinetic, that don’t have fiber specifically in the name, may add fiber to the plan name. Kinetic plans, for example, are either “High-speed internet,” which is a DSL-based service, or “Fiber.” 

If the name doesn’t indicate a fiber or non-fiber product, the speeds will. Fiber is the only connection type capable of delivering symmetrical upload and download speeds. So if a plan offers the same (or close) upload and download speeds, it’s likely fiber. 

Max available speeds may also point to a fiber connection. Cable and fiber are the only connection types that can reach multigigabit speeds, but max advertised speeds from cable reach at most 2,000Mbps, or 2 gigabits per second (Cox and Xfinity offer 2,000Mbps in select areas, Astound has a 1,500Mbps plan). Fiber, on the other hand, can reach much faster speeds, up to 5Gbps, 8Gbps or higher.

Of course, you can also ask a sales or customer service representative what connection type the internet provider uses. 

How we chose the best available fiber ISPs

CNET’s broadband reviews and best lists often involve considering, researching and evaluating several different attributes, from availability and plan selection to service terms and customer satisfaction. To learn more, see our breakdown of how we review internet service providers.

For a list that focuses solely on availability such as the one above, coverage area and total units served are the biggest considerations. 

Broadband maps and data from the Federal Communications Commission are our primary sources when determining an internet provider’s availability. While admittedly imperfect, the data gives us a solid understanding of where an internet provider offers service and the connection type, such as fiber, they use.

Using FCC data, we identified fiber internet providers with multi-state availability and coverage of at least 0.3% households (around 500,000 units) nationwide. Qualifying providers are featured in the best list above. 

Fiber in my area FAQs

Why isn’t fiber internet available in more areas?

Fiber internet requires a direct fiber-optic line to the home or at least to a nearby hub where a coaxial cable will carry the connection the rest of the way. Fiber-optic cables aren’t cheap, nor is the process of installing them. 

Deployment of new fiber lines takes time and typically occurs only in areas with high population density — locations where ISPs have a better chance of seeing a return on their investment.

When will fiber internet come to my area?

According to the FCC, fiber availability is improving, indicating fiber providers are expanding their networks and coverage areas. From December 2022 to December 2023, fiber availability rose from 38% nationwide to around 43%, representing an increase of around 10 million units. 

Despite the improving availability, it’s difficult to say when you can expect to see fiber internet in your area. If you’re in a highly populated or growing area, particularly one with a local fiber provider or two, new fiber expansion may include your neighborhood in the near future.

Most fiber providers allow potential customers to sign up to receive notifications when service comes to their area. You may also be able to fill out a service request form to help promote expansion in your area.

Is fiber or 5G internet better?

Fiber internet has a faster speed potential, often with a better speed variety, and superior reliability compared to 5G home internet. The only real advantage 5G has over fiber internet is availability, as the wireless delivery method has enabled providers such as T-Mobile Home Internet and Verizon 5G Home Internet to rapidly enter and disrupt the broadband market.

So, 5G is more likely to be available than fiber internet, but if given the choice of the two, I would recommend fiber internet.


 

Reference

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